Star find - The pavement found during excavation.

The main discovery was a remarkable stone pavement. This was made up of small stone pieces mainly of granite and some quartz and covered an area of approximately 5.5 m². This lay under a variable depth of topsoil (0.15 to 0.35m ). That this survived at all was due to the fact that the collapsed cromlech had protected the ground beneath. Over the past 50 years more large stones were heaped up onto the pile and these continued to ensure that the original area of the chamber lay well protected from damage by the plough. The “floor” of the monument - an intact stone pavement - is made up of two elements. One is a narrow strip of compacted small stones which formed a hard-standing surface arranged in a doughnut-like circuit. Approximately three-quarters of this circuit had survived below the topsoil on the northern, western and southern sides of the monument. Originally, this probably formed a complete circuit - its absent eastern side had been removed during the first restoration of the monument in the 19th century. This circuit wrapped around, and contained within, a pavement made up of larger stones. Both surfaces would have been protected by the suspended capstone when it was in place, but, at the front end of the monument (in the north-west), a fine narrow strip of the pavement extended well beyond the shelter of the capstone. The original pavement was covered during the restoration to keep it safe.

On a late autumn Sunday in 2014 some of the volunteers involved in the various activities met again to begin the laying of a reconstructed pavement mirroring the archaeology discovered as part of the excavation back in 2012.

People brought favourite stones from all over the UK and beyond to contribute to the reconstruction of the pavement, including Carn Brea in West Penwith, the Algarve, Cot Valley, Godrevy, serpentine stones from the Lizard, a pebble from Boden Fogou, a crystal from Redruth and even some blue stones from the Preseli Mountains in South West Wales, amongst many others. The pavement is a work in progress and it's hoped visitors to the site will continue to bring stones from all over the UK, if not the world, to add to and complete this representation of the archaeology preserved in situ underground. It will be interesting to see how this develops in coming years.

 

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